Sockeye Salmon

Sockeye Salmon

Latin name: Oncorhynchus Nerka,
Conservsation status: least concern (population is stable)

Sockeye Salmon, once they leave the fresh water where they are born, may travel as far away as 2600 miles before returning to the same waters to spawn, one to four years later.

For decades wild salmon populations have been in decline from human causes: over fishing; habitat degradation—logging, mining, agriculture and dams; pollution; and interaction with hatchery or farmed salmon. These conditions and threats may hinder their ability to adapt to the effects of climate change. Salmon thrive at specific freshwater temperatures—warming air raises water temperature. Early snow melt and increased rains cause physical changes to spawning streams.


Other animals at risk

Tufted Puffin
Tufted Puffin
Puffins dive as deep as 200 ft. for food, stay under water for more than a minute, and fly up to 40 mph.
Beluga
Beluga
Belugas make such a variety of sounds—clicks, twitters, whistles, and mimics of other sounds—they have been nicknamed "sea canaries." As much as 40% of their body mass is blubber, which stores energy and keeps them warm in temperatures as low as 0 °C. The smallest whale on the planet, a baby Beluga gains up to 200 pounds a day.
Hawksbill Sea Turtle
Hawksbill Sea Turtle
One of the smallest sea turtles, the Hawksbill lives 30-50 years and feeds on sponges that are toxic to most other marine animals.
Rusty Patched Bumble Bee
Rusty Patched Bumble Bee
Bees have existed on the planet for at least 40 million years. There are 250 species of bumblebees and seven species of honeybees. Fatter and furrier than honeybees, bumble bees make only a small amount of honey for their own food.

The Sockeye Salmon is at risk from climate change because of:The Sockeye Salmon is also threatened by: