Monarch Butterfly

Monarch Butterfly

Latin name: Danaus Plexippus,
Conservsation status: vulnerable (population is decreasing)

Millions of Monarch butterflies migrate up to 3,000 miles each winter, farther than any other butterfly—travelling 50 to 100 miles a day. The Monarch can smell its mate from 5 miles away.

The annual North American migration of the Monarch is listed as a "threatened phenomenon." Climate related threats include: drought, storms, changes in precipitation and dependence on temperature to trigger migration and reproduction. The Monarch feeds and lays eggs exclusively on milkweed plants, so it is also highly vulnerable to herbicides and habitat destruction.


Other animals at risk

Whooping Crane
Whooping Crane
The tallest bird in North America, the Whooping Crane is able to fly 500 miles a day. Some young cranes hatched in captivity learned their migration routes by following ultralight air craft.
Bicknells Thrush
Bicknells Thrush
One of the rarest birds in North America, the female may have up to four mates at one time.
Narwhal
Narwhal
The rarest of whales, the Narwhal—"unicorn of the ocean"—has two teeth, one of which can grow more than nine feet long in the male. The tooth is sensitive to temperatures and chemicals in the water and scientists think it enables males to find food as well as females ready to mate. Narwhals dive deeper than any whales—as deep as 5,000 feet—and stay under for 25 minutes before surfacing for air.
Arctic Fox
Arctic Fox
With fur on the bottom of their feet (vulpes lagopus means "hair-footed fox"), reserves of fat, the ability to slow their metabolism when food is scarce, and a thick coat that changes from white to brown or gray with the season, Arctic Foxes are especially adapted to the tundra.

The Monarch Butterfly is at risk from climate change because of:The Monarch Butterfly is also threatened by: