Emperor Penguin

Emperor Penguin

Latin name: Aptenodytes Forsteri,
Conservsation status: near threatened (population is stable)

The Emperor is the largest of all penguins, standing as tall as four feet. Males withstand the Antarctic weather for up to two months without eating—keeping the eggs warm in a feathered pouch on their feet. Females travel up to 50 miles a day to bring food to the newly-hatched chicks.

In 50 years, the mean temperature of western Antarctica has risen nearly 3 °C—more than any other region—reducing the extent and thickness of winter ice. The Emperor Penguin is dependent on the ice for breeding, raising chicks and moulting. Less sea ice decreases zooplankton (krill) which feed on algae that grow on the underside of the ice. Krill are an important part of the food web for the Emperor and other Antarctic marine species.


Other animals at risk

Ringed Seal
Ringed Seal
Ringed seals are the smallest of all seals and live primarily in the Arctic Ocean. They are able to dive as deep as 300 feet and stay under for up to 45 minutes. They blow bubbles before surfacing to check for Polar Bears, their main predator. The seals use their sharp claws to make breathing holes in the thick ice.
Tufted Puffin
Tufted Puffin
Puffins dive as deep as 200 ft. for food, stay under water for more than a minute, and fly up to 40 mph.
Monarch Butterfly
Monarch Butterfly
Millions of Monarch butterflies migrate up to 3,000 miles each winter, farther than any other butterfly—travelling 50 to 100 miles a day. The Monarch can smell its mate from 5 miles away.
Western Glacier Stonefly
Western Glacier Stonefly
One of 3,500 species of Stoneflies, this rare insect breeds in only a few cold water streams immediately below melting glaciers or next to permanent snowfields in Glacier National Park, USA.

The Emperor Penguin is at risk from climate change because of:The Emperor Penguin is also threatened by: