American Pika

American Pika

Latin name: Ochotona Princeps,
Conservsation status: least concern (population is decreasing)

Pikas, also called "whistling hares" because of their loud song, feed in winter on dried haypiles they have stored near the entrance to their burrows. When haying during late summer they may make up to 100 trips a day.

Pikas live primarily in cool micro-climates on rocky slopes, feeding in adjacent meadows. Warmer temperatures and reduced snowpack are the main threats. Some Pikas may move to higher, cooler regions if there is enough vegetation. Pikas living in lower, warmer regions are at risk if they attempt to move to other regions as they are extremely sensitive to heat—more than two hours in temperatures over 78 °F can be lethal. Without enough winter snow for insulation, Pikas will freeze.


Other animals at risk

Koala
Koala
The Koala is not a bear, but a marsupial. Like the kangaroo, it carries its young in a pouch. It rarely drinks water—Koala means "no water" in native Australian. Its water and food come from eucalyptus leaves, which are water rich but nutrient poor. To conserve energy, the Koala naps up to 20 hours a day and stays up in its home trees most of the time.
Black-footed Albatross
Black-footed Albatross
The Black-Footed Albatross lives up to 60 years and may travel thousands of miles in a lifetime, using a specialized gliding technique that saves muscle and energy. It is able to smell food across vast expanses of ocean. Mates court for two years and pair for life.
Bicknells Thrush
Bicknells Thrush
One of the rarest birds in North America, the female may have up to four mates at one time.
Staghorn Coral
Staghorn Coral
Coral reefs are the most diverse ecosystems in the marine world and can take 10,000 years to form. They cover less than 1% of the ocean floor but are habitat for at least 25% of all known marine life. A coral is made up of thousands of tiny animals called polyps, protected by a hard skeleton. There are 160 different species of Staghorn Coral.

The American Pika is at risk from climate change because of: